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Therese McGinn

Chair

Professor Emerita of Population and Family Health, Columbia University

Therese McGinn

Chair

Professor Emerita of Population and Family Health, Columbia University RESEARCH FOR HEALTH IN HUMANITARIAN CRISES

During her more than 30 years of public health work, Dr McGinn focused on using sound data collection and analysis to improve the scope and quality of reproductive health services globally, in order for women and men to make choices about their sexual and reproductive lives. Dr McGinn has focused most intently in Africa but also has experience in Asia, Middle East, Latin America and Eastern Europe. Since the mid-1990s, her work included a substantive focus on the reproductive health of populations affected by wars and natural disasters. She also taught and mentored generations of students at the graduate and doctoral levels.

Dr McGinn received the Doctor of Public Health degree from Columbia University with a dissertation on fertility desires and behavior of women in post-genocide Rwanda, the Master of Public Health degree from the University of Michigan in Population Planning, and the Bachelor of Arts degree from Cornell University in Development Economics.

Shannon Doocy

Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Shannon Doocy

Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Shannon received her doctoral degree in International Health from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health where her coursework and dissertation focused on humanitarian health.  She has over 15 years of experience conducting research and evaluation in humanitarian emergencies and post-emergency contexts.  Shannon’s work focuses on populations affected by natural disasters and conflict, including both refugees and internally displaced populations in camp and non-camp settings. Within the context of humanitarian emergencies, her areas of interest include health service access and delivery, nutrition and food security, livelihoods and cash interventions.

Her work is centered on the development of context-specific approaches for population-based surveys, needs assessments and the monitoring and evaluation of humanitarian assistance programs, that are rigorous yet feasible to implement given situational constraints of emergency settings. The focus is on implementation science, with the aim of informing ongoing humanitarian assistance and health programs and in the longer-term, providing an evidence base for emergency response programs and policies. Recent research and evaluation projects have been implemented in collaboration with NGOs, UN agencies, and other academic institutions in a variety of countries including Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Pakistan, the Philippines, Somalia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo among others.

Fouad M. Fouad

Assistant Professor of Public Health Practice, American University of Beirut

Fouad M. Fouad

Assistant Professor of Public Health Practice, American University of Beirut

Fouad is Assistant Professor of Public Health Practice at Epidemiology & Population Health Department at the Faculty of Health Sciences, and a Co-Director of the Refugees Health Program at the Global Health Institute at the American University of Beirut (AUB).

His current research interests focus on the forced displaced population, chronic diseases in humanitarian settings and health system in a conflict context. He has a special interest in healthcare in danger and the attacking healthcare facilities as well as the humanitarian response to violent conflict.

Fouad is a Principal Investigator and Co-Investigator of several projects on non-communicable diseases in the protracted and armed conflict including cancer care and mental health in countries in crises.

He served as a commissioner in two Lancet Commissions; AUB Lancet Commission on Syria and the crises in global governance, health and aid; and UCL Lancet Commission on Migration and Health

Iza Ciglenecki

Operational Research Coordinator, MSF

Iza Ciglenecki

Operational Research Coordinator, MSF RESEARCH FOR HEALTH IN HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Iza studied medicine in Ljubljana, Slovenia, and did additional training in tropical medicine and epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. She has been working with MSF since 2001 as a doctor and medical and emergency coordinator based mainly in sub-Saharan Africa, a medical advisor for outbreak response and epidemiology based in Geneva and recently as manager of emergency programmes. Iza is currently coordinating operational research for MSF Operational Center Geneva. Her main focus is on control of epidemics, with particular interest in vaccine preventable outbreaks and introduction of new vaccines in outbreak control (such as cholera or hepatitis E).

Emmanuel D’Harcourt

Senior public health physician, Independent

Emmanuel D’Harcourt

Senior public health physician, Independent RESEARCH FOR HEALTH IN HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Emmanuel is a pediatrician and public health physician who has worked for the Peace Corps, the Pasteur Institute, and for 17 years with the International Rescue Committee, in various roles including Senior Health Director.

He has worked as a clinician, researcher, outbreak responder, and manager. He has lived in Senegal, Bolivia, and Rwanda, and worked in Africa and Asia, focusing on child health, reproductive health, and health systems in communities affected by conflict.

He received his MD from Johns Hopkins University and his MPH from Harvard University, and completed a pediatric residency at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Michelle Gayer

Director Emergency Health, IRC

Michelle Gayer

Director Emergency Health, IRC RESEARCH FOR HEALTH IN HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Michelle Gayer is a medical doctor with education in public health, economics, and management.

Her career over the last almost 20 years, starting in Australia then working with MSF (Doctors Without Borders) and WHO (World Health Organization), at country and global levels, evolving from technical to managerial & policy roles, has been devoted to ensuring evidence-based health interventions and services for vulnerable populations in emergency settings, especially conflict and disasters.

With MSF she had numerous roles in conflict-affected countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, including as Country Director. Her several roles at WHO between 2003-2016 included Coordinator of WHO’s Disease Control in Emergencies Program, Global Director of Emergencies where she was responsible for WHO’s worldwide humanitarian emergency program of work, and finally as Director of WHO’s Emergency Reform, where she was responsible for managing the design of WHO’s new Health Emergencies Programme. Michelle joined the International Rescue Committee in June 2016 to lead its work in health, WASH and nutrition in emergencies.

She has published numerous international technical guidelines on infectious disease control in emergencies, built capacity of government and international health agencies, and provided direct field assistance for public health risk assessment, disease surveillance, outbreak preparedness and response and health strategic planning.

Michelle Hynes

Epidemiologist, Emergency Response and Recovery Branch (ERRB), U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Michelle Hynes

Epidemiologist, Emergency Response and Recovery Branch (ERRB), U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention RESEARCH FOR HEALTH IN HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Michelle Hynes, PhD, MPH is an epidemiologist with the Emergency Response and Recovery Branch (ERRB) at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and an adjunct professor for Emory University’s Hubert Department of Global Health. She received her MPH in population and family health from Columbia University and her PhD in behavioral sciences from Emory University. Dr. Hynes has over 2 decades of experience working in humanitarian settings on sexual and reproductive health and gender-based violence throughout Africa, Asia, and South America. Her work focuses on operational research, program evaluation, and global guideline development. In addition to her work at CDC, Dr. Hynes has worked for several international NGOs and UN agencies, and was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Guinea, West Africa.

Adam Levine

Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Adam Levine

Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University RESEARCH FOR HEALTH IN HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Adam Levine is an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Director of the Brown University Global Emergency Medicine Fellowship. He received his Medical Doctorate from the University of California, San Francisco and his Masters of Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley before completing his specialty training in Emergency Medicine at the Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency in Boston.

In recent years, Dr. Levine has responded to humanitarian emergencies in Haiti, Libya, South Sudan, and Liberia and has led research and training initiatives in South Asia, East Africa, and West Africa. He currently serves as the Director for the Humanitarian Innovation Initiative at Brown University, whose goals are to improve the quality and professionalize the delivery of humanitarian assistance worldwide, and as the Primary Investigator for the Global Emergency Response and Recovery Project for International Medical Corps, focused on improving international and local capacity for responding to future epidemics and pandemics. He also serves as Editor-in-chief for Academic Emergency Medicine Journal’s annual Global Emergency Medicine Literature Review. His own NIH and foundation-funded research focuses on improving the delivery of emergency care in resource-limited settings and during humanitarian emergencies.

Nate Miller

Health Adviser, UNICEF

Nate Miller

Health Adviser, UNICEF RESEARCH FOR HEALTH IN HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Nate Miller is a Health Advisor at UNICEF Headquarters, focusing primarily on conducting research and providing technical support on community-based maternal, newborn, and child health in emergency settings. Dr. Miller also holds faculty positions at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

Previously, Dr. Miller conducted research on community health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and spent several years managing and providing technical support to malaria control programs in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia with The MENTOR Initiative and USAID.

Dr. Miller’s research interests include provision of primary healthcare services in hard-to-reach contexts, community health in emergencies, improving primary healthcare service delivery, and methods for assessing and evaluating health programs.

He has worked in several countries, including Angola, Benin, Central African Republic, Chad, Ethiopia, Guinea, Haiti, Liberia, Mozambique, Myanmar, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, and Timor-Leste.

Oliver Morgan

Director of the Health Emergency Information and Risk Assessment Department, WHO Health Emergencies Program

Oliver Morgan

Director of the Health Emergency Information and Risk Assessment Department, WHO Health Emergencies Program RESEARCH FOR HEALTH IN HUMANITARIAN CRISES

From 2007 through 2016, Dr. Morgan worked for the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during which time he held critical leadership positions in the Ebola response between November 2014 and February 2016 (CDC Atlanta Ebola Response Incident Manger and CDC Country Director in Sierra Leone). From March 2010 to October 2014, Dr. Morgan was the CDC Country Director in the Dominican Republic. Dr. Morgan was an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer at CDC from 2007 to 2009 with the International Emerging Infections Program, during which time he conducted projects in Thailand, Bangladesh, Kenya, Uganda, and Guatemala. Before joining CDC, Dr. Morgan worked for the UK Health Protection Agency, leading epidemiological investigations of outbreaks (enteric, vaccine preventable, hospital acquired, zoonotic, respiratory, and sexually acquired infections), chemical and radiation exposure incidents, terrorist bombings in London, natural disasters, and humanitarian civil conflicts. Dr. Morgan has also worked as a consultant to WHO/PAHO in several countries. Dr. Morgan’s academic achievements include a doctorate in epidemiology from Imperial College London and extensive publication in peer reviewed journals and reference books.

Bayard Roberts

Professor Health Systems and Policy, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Bayard Roberts

Professor Health Systems and Policy, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine RESEARCH FOR HEALTH IN HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Since joining LSHTM in 2005 I have worked on a range of research studies on themes of health determinants, systems and policies in transitional settings, including those affected by armed conflict and forced migration. I have a particular interest in mental health and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and have led studies examining the burden of mental disorders and health care utilisation among conflict-affected populations in Ukraine, Georgia, northern Uganda, and South Sudan; mortality estimation in fragile and resource-poor settings; and evaluating MSF’s NCD programmes  in Democratic Republic of Congo and Jordan. I am currently a co-investigator and work package lead for an EC funded study examining the potential for scaling-up a low-intensity mental health intervention for Syrian refugees in 8 countries. I have also received research funding from the Wellcome Trust, ESRC, DFID, and USAID. I co-edited the 2017 Lancet Series on Health in Humanitarian Crises, and I am Editor-in-Chief of the BMC journal Conflict and Health.

Les Roberts

Professor, Population & Family Health, Columbia

Les Roberts

Professor, Population & Family Health, Columbia RESEARCH FOR HEALTH IN HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Following a post-doctorate fellowship in epidemiology at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where he worked for 4 years, Les subsequently worked as an epidemiologist for the World Health Organization in Rwanda during the civil war. He was Director of Health Policy at the International Rescue Committee from 2000 until 2003. Les had led over 50 surveys in 17 countries, mostly measuring mortality in times of war. In recent years’ he has taken part in studies to measure mortality in DR Congo, Iraq, and Zimbabwe. His present research is focused on developing methods to document human rights abuses.

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